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balance

This horse has been a long term project. She presented with thin soles, contracted heels, no appreciable walls and her feet were packed solid with overlaid bar and lumpy sole material. She also had a negative palmer angle behind of 5 and 6 degrees. Her foot problems were mostly blamed on her being a Thoroughbred, but she is growing in a high quality new foot with thick walls and good sole depth.

We started by pulling her shoes and trimming out as much of the impacted bar as possible. She was on stall rest in a deeply bedded stall during this part of the process and rapidly grew sounder while we revisited her trim every week. Each week her feet changed dramatically as they decontracted. We did not get pictures of this stage unfortunately. When they stopped changing dramatically we cast her with Equipack, one front foot at at time, to see how she would handle frog support. She did well and we were able to do her second foot a few weeks later. Then she was able to start getting hand walked.

Fast forwarding to this trim and shoeing cycle, she is back to work and sound but her rehabilitation is far from over. Now that her foot has grown about half way down it’s time to start looking at how her upper body and joints were affected by being out of balance for so long. We will update this case study as it proceeds.

Very grateful to good clients, barn management and training for doing their part in getting this nice horse sound again for her young rider.

Not perfect but so much closer!
We check for balance from all angles. At this point, we are very happy to see this foot much better balanced laterally and the heels beginning to decontract.
Mike wasn’t thrilled with this clip set up but Gayle snapped the photo anyway so she could get out of his way.. to show off that this horses dorsal (toe) wall is finally straight. You can see the line about half way down where her new foot is growing in at an entirely different angle from the old and that her heel is pushing out and relaxing. We get asked a lot why the toe is over the shoe.. it’s because the shoe is set back to the correct position to support the bony column. This puts her breakover at a better place and stimulates the correct part of her foot. She is in steel with a leather pad and pink (soft) Equipack under, carefully poured from the point of frog to the back of the foot.

One reply on “balance”

I am very glad too see documentation of just how long and painstaking a process genuine hoof rehab is. I am looking forward to following the full-body impact of the changing hoof angles as the hoof grows out.

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